10 Days of Halloween with L. Sydney Fisher

Many thanks to Emerald Barnes!

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Today, I’m thrilled to share with you an excerpt from a lovely lady I had the pleasure of meeting a few weeks ago at a reading for a fundraiser for a local library. She writes an array of fiction, some based on real events like the book she’s featuring today: The Devil’s Board. Let’s all give a warm welcome to L. Sydney Fisher. *cheers*

l syndney fisher book

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A note from Sydney…

While doing research for The Devil’s Board, I was contacted by two different individuals who did not know each other and who did not attend Riverside at the same time.  Both of these individuals told me about personal experiences they had while a student at Riverside.  To my amazement, one of the individuals revealed that they once lived in the very same dorm room where Amber Simmons used the Ouija board in 1987.  This person disclosed that they had experienced inexplicable mood swings and depression…

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Woman records unique voice of sunflower—it sounds like music from other dimension

LISTEN!

It might be hard to believe but plants not only respond to sound but they also produce their own sound. While it is easy to assume that plants like trees and flowers are the stoic living decorations in your garden, it turns out that they pretty much communicate with each other through their own voice. …

Source: Woman records unique voice of sunflower—it sounds like music from other dimension

An Excerpt from The Haunted Volume III

 

The Lincoln House (5)
Circa, 1833

Situated on a hillside in the Columbus Historic District is the renowned Lincoln House built in 1833. The two level, wood framed house was once home to Columbus mayor, C. L. Lincoln. The house has been in the family for more than 135 years. It’s one of the oldest pre-Civil War homes in the city and in recent years past, the home was a popular bed and breakfast.

Noteworthy features of the home include a front porch with original wavy glass jib windows, white columns, and a front door with the original blue and red Venetian side lights. The house also includes a basement where the original kitchen was located along with a carriage house and stables. As decades have passed, the house has undergone modern updates and the addition of brick floors in the original English basement. The Lincoln Home is the recipient of a Heritage Trust Award (1999) and an award winning landmark in the history of Columbus.

The present day home owes its gratitude to the owners, Sidney and Brenda Caradine who have lovingly preserved the house, but a number of eye witnesses have left the Caradine’s wondering if some of its ghostly residents are still there, reminding us of its beloved past.

In November of 2017, a friend and I purchased tickets to the Ghosts and Legends Tour that’s held annually in the Fall. After arriving in downtown Columbus at the Tennessee Williams home and Welcome Center, we boarded a bus for an hour long tour. The bus navigated through the downtown area, stopping at various points along the way. Each time the bus reached a tour stop, all guests exited and were joined by guides wearing costumes relative to the historic period and story that they narrated.

We made a few stops before we reached The Lincoln House, and even though I had already heard that the house was haunted, I didn’t know any details about the place. The bus driver turned at the corner of College and 7th Street, slowly making his way along the dimly lit street. Then just as we approached the house, I noticed a man standing near the right end of the porch and a lovely, brown-haired woman gazing out the front window. Both of them were dressed in period costumes with the woman’s hair pulled up and tucked into a loose bun at the crown of her head. Her ivory dress was a floor length, chiffon gown with a high-neck lace collar. The gentleman standing outside on the porch was dressed in captain’s attire with a poet sleeve, white shirt and a bayonet by his side.

The bus pulled forward a few feet from the steps leading up to the top of the porch where we all exited and gathered in a semi-circle at the bottom of the steps. We were greeted by the home’s hostess who was dressed as Mother Goose. As she stood on the front porch steps, we listened as she narrated The Lincoln House story in a rich southern dialect that echoed the southern belle’s voices of the past. Then we were introduced to Sidney Caradine who finished the narration with another ghostly tale.

At the completion of the stories, I was surprised that we were being led back to the bus. I looked beyond the steps and toward the window where the Victorian lady stood just moments before. Wasn’t she a part of the tour? I assumed that we would be entering the front parlor of the house to hear another haunted story. However, my assumption was not only wrong, but the woman in the window had now disappeared!

A bewildered expression covered my face as I turned to our guide, Dr. Bridget Pieschel, a local expert on the town’s history and also an English professor and Director of the Center of Women’s Research and Public Policy at MUW (Mississippi University for Women, 1884).

“Aren’t we going inside the house?” I asked.

“No, we don’t go inside.” Dr. Pieschel answered, shaking her head.

“Oh.” I replied with a downturned smile as I started for the steps, and then I stopped. I turned and looked back at the porch.

“There was a woman in the window.” I said pointing to the front of the house. For a moment, I worried if I should mention the work that I do. Paranormal research wasn’t for everybody, but I felt a strong nudge to mention it.

“Well, this is Mother Goose. You know, she just narrated a part of the story here on the front steps and Mr. Caradine was on the front porch, but they’re the only two hosts here.”

I shook my head and responded with a nervous laugh. Fearing I might sound crazy, I leaned forward and whispered.

“I saw a woman in that window. She was standing right there.” I pointed to the window to the right of the front door.  Mr. Caradine’s wife joined us on the sidewalk at just that moment and introduced herself to me.

“I’m Brenda Caradine. You must have seen Miss Sue.”

“Miss Sue? Oh, is she inside the house?”

“No, you must have seen her ghost. She’s the ghost that appeared to the women who stayed in the downstairs room.” She said with a genuine and bold confidence.

A tingling chill crept over my body. I rubbed the goosebumps now evident on my arms and nodded. Then without hesitation, I asked Mrs. Caradine if I could come back at a later time and interview her. If the image that I saw standing in the window was, in fact, a ghost then I knew that I had to know more about The Lincoln Home and its history.

“Mrs. Caradine, would it be okay to contact you in a few weeks and schedule a time to talk with you. I am a writer and paranormal researcher.”

Mrs. Caradine’s approval was immediate as her eyes lit up. “Oh, yes. Please do!”

“Okay, I will be in touch with you in a few weeks. And thank you so much.” I shook her hand and then followed Dr. Pieschel back to the bus.

Just as I sat down next to Lisa, she immediately noticed the expression on my face. She looked at me as if she was waiting for me to tell her what was on my mind. As the bus began to move, I turned to look back at the house.

“Lisa, when we first pulled up to the house, did you see a woman inside that window?” I pointed toward the front porch.

“Yes, she was standing by the front door.”  Cold chills spread across my arms again.

“What did she look like?”

“She was wearing a white dress. Her hair was in a bun—

“Oh my God.” I mumbled as I covered my mouth.

“What’s wrong?”

“Lisa, I saw the same thing, but I saw the image of that woman standing on the inside of that window. The owner of the house just confirmed to me that no one was inside the house at the time they were telling the stories.”

Lisa smiled and nodded. “Wow. We just saw a ghost.”

“I believe we did. And if it’s the same ghost that they spoke of during the story, I have to know more. I’m coming back.” I promised as the bus pulled away from the curb.

Two months later, I phoned the Caradines and arranged to meet Sidney at The Lincoln House. After driving for an hour, I arrived in front of the house and parked along the street. I got out of the car and grabbed my backpack and camera case before climbing the same steps that had led me to the front of the house just weeks before when I first saw the ghost.

I paused for a moment on the sidewalk and studied the front porch area. The nervous flutter of “butterflies” in my stomach consumed me as I began to put one foot in front of the other. I walked steadfast toward the front of the house when all of a sudden the front door opened, and I was greeted by a tall gentleman dressed in a red, button down shirt and wearing a baseball cap. He closed the door behind him and introduced himself.

“Hey, I’m David. Can I help you? Maybe carry something for you?” He asked, extending his hand.

I smiled and replied. “Oh, thank you, but it’s not too much.”

“Did you have a nice drive over?” David led me to the door.

“Yes, it’s been a sunny February day.” I answered with a smile.

“Come on in and have a seat. Sidney is on his way over from his house next door. He also owns the Amzi Love House that’s been in his family for over a hundred years.” David motioned toward the front room on the right.

“Oh my! That’s intriguing.” I marveled.

As I entered the wide open entry from the foyer, my senses immediately alerted me that we were not alone. I sat my backpack and camera bag down on the corner of the sofa and then moved toward a pair of wingback chairs positioned right in front of the window where I had seen the woman’s apparition. David followed me taking a seat in the chair to the left of me.

No sooner had I sat down than the image of a man dressed in a dark suit appeared before me. He stood near the entry to the parlor and appeared to be uninterested in us until David handed me a photo. Then without warning, the now invisible man stood over me, leaning down as if he was looking at the picture in my hand. Amused and slightly unnerved by the drop in temperature near me, I leaned toward David.

“He’s standing over me!” I blurted out before I could stop myself.

David glanced at me, his eyes wide open and fixed on the space directly in front of me. Although I felt like an idiot, I couldn’t ignore how the entire left side of my body was now icy cold. I rubbed my arm in an attempt to warm myself. Then I twisted my body in the chair and faced David in an effort to ignore the ghostly presence. I placed a notepad on my lap and began to write down important details as David talked about the history of the house and some of the paranormal stories that had surfaced over the years.

Shortly thereafter, we were joined by Sidney and Brenda Caradine. I was immediately charmed by Mr. Caradine’s gentile manner as I observed him with his wife. Due to Mrs. Caradine’s failing health, Sidney had assumed a more protective and nurturing role, but both of them still exhibited a passionate love for the house as they shared stories of family history and legacies left behind for the last 185 years.

One of Sidney’s most intriguing stories involved the paranormal encounter with a large, handcrafted replica of a trolley car that still sits in the parlor today. Years ago, friends of the Caradine family came to stay at the Lincoln House. After enjoying a southern dinner and fellowship, the couple retired for the evening. Nothing unusual had happened in the home since their arrival and they had no reason to suspect anything out of the ordinary, but sometime after midnight, they were awakened by a loud and unexpected sound coming from the foyer.

The two of them lay quiet with bewildered looks and creepy goose bumps as they listened to the sound of Louie Armstrong singing It’s a Wonderful World. The music was crisp and clear as the sound bounced off the walls of the Lincoln House, and then as the couple slowly edged off the bed and out into the hall, they were shocked to find the music coming from the trolley. A handcrafted trolley that had been in the family’s heirlooms for decades without anyone ever knowing that it was a music box!

They all examined the trolley the following day and found the hidden mechanism that was responsible for activating the music, but after examining the switch and finding it difficult to slide forward, it seemed impossible for it to come on without someone manually moving it. And so the mystery remains to this day. Who turned the trolley on after decades of silence?

I listened and watched Sidney’s pale blue eyes as they widened and filled with awe while he told the trolley story, and Mrs. Caradine’s almost childlike wonder burst forth each time she took a breath while telling her own personal account with the ghosts of the Lincoln House. It was enough to convince me that I had to spend the night there, even if it was only once. And before the end of our interview, my reservation had been made.
Thrilled and now committed to contacting the ghosts of the Lincoln House, I had to find a team. A team of ghost hunters who wanted to make contact here as much as I did. In just two weeks, the ghost hunt would commence.

Get the rest of the story!

 

The Paranormal Investigations.

Lincoln House Promo (1)

 

Have you heard about the paranormal investigation at The Lincoln Home?

Get the story of the overnight investigation conducted here and find out why Sydney considers this to be some of her most convincing research yet.

Visit some of the most haunted sites of the South in historic Columbus, Mississippi.  Known as a hospital town during the Civil War, this city’s collection of antebellum treasures is one of the largest and most well preserved in the South.

The Princess Theatre, Old Waverley Mansion, and Friendship Cemetery are just a sample of the sites you’ll read about as clairvoyants visit here and report their findings.

Help Sydney solve the mystery of Friendship Cemetery’s ghost soldier whose name may be Daniel Welch.

And for the paranormal finale, read about the sanitarium in Amory, Mississippi known today as The Amory Museum where a young patient still pleads for help as visitors pass by his now empty bed.

The critics are saying…

“Encore, Encore!  This is the best one yet!”

Get the Book!

The Haunting at Waverly

L. Sydney Fisher, #1 Amazon Bestselling Author, Thrillers & Suspense

Waverly Mansion

The Haunting at Waverly Mansion

      Magnificent magnolias stand tall shadowing the grounds of the mansion built by Colonel George Hampton Young in 1852.  Upon entering the main brick gates, a rich green path of shrubbery guides visitors to the Italian marble steps leading to the front door.  It’s a stunning sight of grandeur that causes its guests to halt in their footsteps as they approach.  Two giant towering white columns line the front of the mansion, and the octagonal shaped cupola rests atop the fourth floor like a crown claiming its glory as the mansion overlooks the Tombigbee River.

       As visitor’s marvel at the interior self-supporting staircases and the craftsmanship of detailed molding that frames every room in the house, a host of invisible eyes watches each guest travel from one room to the next.  These eyes once belonged to lovers who courted in the parlor…

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15 Things You Didn’t Know about The Haunting of Natalie Bradford.

 

Bradford Kindle Cover
#1 Amazon Bestseller
  1. While L. Sydney Fisher was writing the book, she often experienced paranormal phenomena in her home that included loud crashing noises, the sound of something being dragged across the floor, scraping sounds, and an unseen ghostly visitor who often breezed past her chair during night-time writing sessions.
  2. During the audio production of the book, the narrator, Robin Ericsson reported that he and his family had bizarre experiences.  In a message to Sydney Fisher, Mr. Ericsson confessed to hearing several children’s voices and even reported seeing the apparition of a male figure wearing a red flannel shirt who often watched him while he was recording in the studio.  Devon Bradford often wore flannel shirts when he was alive.
  3. The original court transcripts of Devon Bradford’s murder trial mysteriously disappeared while L. Sydney Fisher was doing research.  After intentionally placing the court files in a separate box in the storage room of the circuit clerk’s office, all the transcripts and original documents vanished two weeks after the author’s last visit.  When Sydney questioned the circuit clerk, she was told that an attorney probably took the file and did not return it.  Why would an attorney want the court records of a trial that was more than three decades old?  The accused was also now deceased.
  4. Unknown to L. Sydney Fisher who changed all of the real names in the book, she identified the real life lover of Liz Bradford by giving a character in the story his real life name.  The author did not know of Liz Bradford’s lover or his identity until the Spring of 2018 when a former acquaintance of the Bradford’s contacted the author after reading the book.  The author believes that the ghost of Liz Bradford communicated with her during the research for the book.
  5. The courtroom where Devon Bradford stood trial in Tupelo, Mississippi still has the original witness stand and furniture from the 1970’s trial, but the courtroom is now locked and used for storage.
  6. The real life judge who presided over Devon Bradford’s trial met L. Sydney Fisher at a book signing several years ago.  After the author confessed that he was the real judge who presided over the 1975 trial, he became a friend and has attended many of the author’s book signings.
  7. The original manuscript was handwritten in a notebook that was tucked away inside a closet and untouched for more than a decade before it was published.
  8. The Haunting of Natalie Bradford first originated as part of a writing assignment for a class the author was enrolled in.
  9. Rebecca and Audrey Bradford are the only living Bradford children who appeared in the story.  Natalie Bradford died from an overdose in 1991.
  10. The site where Liz Bradford was murdered is still a popular restaurant and is known for having the best steak in town.  The restaurant, now known as Woody’s, was also featured on Robert Irvine’s Restaurant Impossible in 2011.  The author had a brief camera moment on the show. The establishment is also known as one of the most haunted locations in the city and reportedly has more than one ghostly resident.  Paranormal activity is as frequent as the “regulars” who dine there.
  11. The kindle e-book and the audio book version for The Haunting of Natalie Bradford are both #1 Amazon Bestsellers in multiple categories.
  12. Natalie Bradford did not believe in ghosts until she lived at Lindenwood.
  13. L. Sydney Fisher carries two permanent reminders of her time at Lindenwood.  On the author’s right index finger is a scar that she received from broken glass.  She gained the second scar, now barely visible on her left foot, after being pushed by an unseen force on the stairs.
  14. Natalie Bradford tried to get her three-month marriage annulled from Devon Bradford, but she was forced to file for a divorce and pay her own attorney’s fees to escape Devon’s grasp.
  15. Lindenwood is the fictional name given to the haunted house where Liz Bradford lived and operated a small hair salon on the first floor.  The home was decorated with Liz’s taste in colors and furnishings.  Years after her death, the home was abandoned by the Bradford’s and fell into ruin.  It was demolished by James Bradford who built another home on the property and lived there until he died in 2016.

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