THE DEVIL’S DEN

Being a paranormal researcher means that I am often contacted by people who are experiencing the paranormal.  So what’s the scariest project that I’ve ever been involved in?  Without a doubt, it’s the chapter in Volume II of my Haunted Series.  The chapter is called The Devil’s Den and after visiting here, I knew the title would be fitting for the story.

Several months before the book’s publication, I was contacted by a woman who had abandoned her home after her husband committed suicide.  I was immediately drawn to her story as she described her husband’s bizarre behavioral changes after moving into the house.   Since I am an empath and clairvoyant, I absorbed the woman’s story and could feel her grief each time that I spoke with her.  She told me that she and her husband had ten wonderful years of marriage until moving into the house located on a dead end road in Rural Mississippi.  She said that they didn’t know much about the land surrounding the home, but they had heard about a murder that had happened there.

The family brushed aside any uneasy feelings about the home’s past and instead focused on getting moved into their new spacious home.  Each of their children could now have their own bedroom, unlike having to share a room in the mobile home where they had lived before.  But within two weeks, strange noises began to haunt the family.  Thumping noises from the basement, footsteps, and running water (no one could find its source) were the first signs that something was wrong here.  Weeks progressed as the woman’s husband battled a growing rage.  He seemed to snap over trivial things and began having conversations with invisible entities.

One day when she was in the kitchen preparing dinner, her husband came up behind her with a knife and told her “I ought to slice your f—ing throat”.  She immediately ran out of the house and didn’t return until hours later when her husband was gone.  This family’s horror climaxed on the morning that her husband committed suicide, but the weeks leading up to the final hour was unlike anything I had ever heard.  The story reminded me of The Amityville Horror, not the fictional accounts, but the part that included the DeFeo murders of 1974.  Ronnie DeFeo was charged on the same day that I am writing this now–44 years ago! (November 14, 1974)  And I believe that the same type of possession that entered Ronnie DeFeo’s body is also what caused this family’s demise.

I scheduled a time to go out to the property and have a look around.  If the energy was as strong as she told me, then I knew I would sense it as soon as I arrived.  A local neighbor and family friend met me at the house.  At first, I didn’t feel anything unusual or sinister as I walked around the property looking into the windows, but as I made my way around the left side of the house, I began to feel overwhelmed with dread.  I stopped and peered inside another window, but then jerked back.  Whatever had been at that house before was still there and I realized that it was now watching me from inside the house.  I hurried around to the front door, but before I could thank the neighbor for showing me the property, my eyes locked straight ahead on the front door side light window where an old hag with hollow eyes stood watching me.  She was humpback, her eyes void of color and hollow without even an iris.  Her skin was pasty white and cheekbones protruded from a sunken face.  I began to breathe fast and tried to keep my composure.  What if the neighbor didn’t see what I was seeing?  I knew that I needed to get out of there.

I quickly said my “good-byes” and started for the car, but just as I opened the door, I witnessed a massive black shadow zoom past me and toward the trees at the front of the property.  I literally could not believe my eyes.  I felt its supernatural power as it soared off the ground.  It seemed to put on a show, flaunting itself as it paced back and forth along the tree line.  A part of me wanted to stay and explore, but I heeded my body’s warning signs urging me to leave the property.  When I arrived home, I raced to my computer and messaged the homeowner.  I asked her to describe the spirits that they had seen while living there.  To my horror and with my mouth hung open, I watched as her words zipped across Facebook messenger as she described exactly what I had just witnessed minutes before.

Days later, I found myself unable to sleep.  Thoughts and visions tormented me about the evil that still dwells on this abandoned property.  The widow continued to contact me, and I confessed everything that I saw and felt while there.  She pleaded with me to go back to the house and go inside.  She wanted me to try and make contact with her deceased husband, but I declined.  To this day, I believe that the only energy that still resides in that house is the evil that caused a young woman to kill her baby and a man who had a loving family finally take his own life after months of demonic torment.

If you would like to read the family’s story, you can find it here~
GET THE BOOK

Sleep with the lights on,

L. Sydney Fisher
On the WEB~https://lsydneyfisher.com/

The Haunted: Legends from The Wilderness
A Haunted History Series
Advertisements

A Supernatural Legacy.

Inspired by TRUE EVENTS.

See No Evil FREE First Time Ever

Get your copy~https://www.amazon.com/See-No-Evil-Sydney-Fisher-ebook/dp/B01KF0I862/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1519248997&sr=8-4&keywords=L+Sydney+Fisher

 

From the Author’s Diary

This story has been percolating in the recesses of my mind since 2013.  After my debut novel The Haunting of Natalie Bradford was released, I had the honor of speaking to a crowd of enthusiastic readers and paranormal fans at the Dixie Regional Library located in Pontotoc, Mississippi.  Unbeknownst to me was the town’s very own psychic celebrity of the 20th century known as Seymour Prater, a man often referred to as The Mississippi Mystic.

The Library Director, Regina Graham approached me with the Prater story as I was preparing to leave that day.  She told me about a man from Pontotoc who was known to have a unique gift that enabled him to find lost objects.  She also advised me that his fame spread far and wide across the southeast earning him notoriety as a “fortune teller”, a label that his wife highly detested.

Stories of Seymour Prater covered the inside pages of newspapers and magazines from time to time.  Fortunately, some of these articles had been saved and collected by the library.  Mrs. Graham invited me to explore the supernatural wonder and offered to help any way that she could.

Fast forward almost two years later to January, 2016.  I had just released my supernatural bestseller, The Phoenix Mission a month earlier.  That book was inspired by the U.S. Army’s psychic spy program, Stargate.  And while my creative tone was fixed on that material, the Prater story easily came to mind as a project that I needed to explore.

After meeting with Mrs. Graham who provided me with the Seymour Prater file of newspaper clippings and family journals, I began my research into the man who often called himself “the man with the radio mind”.  I sat at a long, conference table inside a room designated for Genealogy research and slowly flipped through the newspapers one page at a time, taking it all in.  I was mesmerized.  Seymour Prater and his story was more than I had anticipated, and I knew that most people in the area probably didn’t realize how profound his ability was and what it all meant.  He was destined to be a legend.

As someone who has studied the paranormal and unexplained most of my life, I realized the magnitude of his gift within seconds of picking up that first newspaper article.  My mind raced with thoughts of past explorations.  There was another man who I studied over the years, and he possessed the same abilities as Prater, but this man became known worldwide.  His name was Edgar Cayce, The Sleeping Prophet, and I knew that in order to study Seymour Prater, I needed to study Edgar Cayce one more time.  Don’t miss my addition of The Divinely Gifted at the end of this book.

See No Evil is a project that included detailed research.  This research even included studying the flow of the Tombigbee River and the riverboats that traveled to Aberdeen during the time of Seymour Prater’s boyhood.  It was on that fateful day in Aberdeen, Mississippi when Prater met the man who would deliver a message that shaped the course of his life.  The entire Prater story is laced with providence and even what some may define as predestination.  Pay attention to the opening scenes that have been created most likely as they happened.  Unknown until now, Lewis Prater became Seymour Prater’s father only because Thomas Jefferson Brown was captured and taken prisoner at the Battle of Missionary Ridge in November, 1863.  Fate?

While parts of this story have been dramatized for the sake of storytelling, let it be known that this really happened.  On January 3, 1931, Arthur Floyd was murdered at his store in Carrollton, Mississippi.  And as the town lived in terror from the haunting at the Floyd place, Seymour Prater became the victim’s only hope for solving a murder and putting the angry spirit to rest.  While the town’s folk frantically searched for answers, it was murder at first sight for The Mississippi Mystic.

The Celestial Series

NEW FOR 2018.

Introducing The Celestial Series, a 12 volume short story series. Inspired by REAL LIFE EVENTS that are certain to give you goose bumps and HOPE.

Watch for it…

Volume 1 premieres in a few days. 👻❤️ #Ibelieve #followthelight

 

The Celestial Series

Do YOU Believe?

paranormal research

Be CAREFUL who you share your crazy with…Although statistics have indicated that more than 70% of people believe in some kind of paranormal phenomena, whether it’s ESP or GHOSTS, there will always be those people who get SPOOKED by my questions or research and either not return my requests for an interview or simply look at me as if I am some sort of crazy. Being a paranormal/supernatural author doesn’t mean that I only write about the HAUNTED. I also research miracles/supernatural, unexplained mysteries, military history, NASA exploration, and true crime. BUT paranormal research still tops out as the most fascinating to me. WHY? Because nobody has ever been able to DISPROVE its existence. Regardless of your beliefs, there are literally hundreds of thousands of people worldwide who have experienced phenomena that cannot be explained through rational means. That’s not CRAZY. #statistics #ghostsarereal #haunted #doyoubelieve #Iamnotcrazy#research #amwriting

SEE NO EVIL

Have you heard about this story?

Get the rest of the story here~

https://www.amazon.com/See-No-Evil-Sydney-Fisher/dp/1537099620/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1493484092&sr=8-1

See No Evil April Promo Pic (1)

Archaeology & the Supernatural Connection

Do YOU Believe?

The Mississippi Archaeology Association held its annual meeting on February 17-19, 2017.   A couple of months ago, I discovered that history lovers like me could pay a small membership fee and be a part of excavations around the state.  It was an exciting idea since my formal education in English and Art History did not include Archaeology.  So I decided to join the association because I absolutely love history and secretly wish that I was Indiana Jones.

As the event neared, I became increasingly excited about hanging out with the friends of Indiana Jones.  A roomful of archaeologists.  People who study ancient cultures and dig up bones.  It all seemed so cool, but I began to wonder about the ancient cultures and what might have been their superstitions or religious beliefs.  Had they placed a curse upon any person who disturbs their grave?  Would death certainly come to those guilty of the desecration of a dead man’s bed?

I enjoyed my time in the Archaeology museum on the campus of Mississippi State University, but I learned so much more at the lecture series the following day.  Several professors, archaeologists, and graduate students participated in presentations that included intriguing finds all across the state.  The people of ancient Mississippi were an indigenous culture of hunters.  Nowadays, we never see a black bear or a cougar, but hundreds of years ago, these animals were common and plentiful in the region.  The Native Americans treasured the black bear’s paws and often used the claw in jewelry making.  Over the years, burial sites have been unearthed to find the skeletal remains of an Indian who once lived in a hut that stood over the site of their grave.  Artifacts such as pottery, jewelry, and weaponry have been found beneath the soil surrounding former Native American villages, but as I listened to the speakers discussing these historic archaeological digs, images of a supernatural and superstitious culture filled my mind.

During a ten-minute break, I walked over to the snack table and began pouring myself a cup of coffee when I was joined by an archaeologist who claimed to have experienced the supernatural during some of his digs.  He mentioned that the weather always seemed to turn volatile when a gravesite was disturbed.  Often times, the rain would delay the excavation for days after unearthing human remains.  One such event occurred after “rainmakers” were found by a group of kids who began to play and dance with the ancient rattles.  Little did they know, they were literally “drumming” up a storm.

Remember the curse of King Tutankhamun?  The opening of the Egyptian king’s tomb was reportedly the cause of several deaths.  Although the alleged curse was considered nothing more than superstition to scientists, there are numerous accounts of disaster, bad luck, and even death that has struck after an ancient burial ground has been disturbed.  Superstitions abound and warnings all demand the same adherence.  “Never, ever build on land that is an ancient burial ground or suffer the consequences of the curse!”  The same seems to go for digging up the past.  Better leave it alone.  And if you dig it up, you better put it back the way you found it!

Before the final presentation of the day, I wandered through the room searching for the Director of the Chickasaw Archaeology.  (The Chickasaw Nation once inhabited the hills of North Mississippi) I was eager to speak with him because I wanted to tell him about the land that I currently live on.  I’ve lived here for more than five years and recently discovered that the site was once a Native American village.  Upon learning this, I concluded that the land’s history was the explanation that I had been seeking for a long time.  It’s not unusual for me to live in haunted locations.  I seem to find them no matter where I move.  But this house was not old.  And no one had died here.  At least, not that I knew of.

I found Dr. Lieb and quickly introduced myself.  We talked for a few minutes about the area in North Mississippi and the ghostly sightings that had been reported.  As I continued to tell him about my experiences and the sighting of the white wolf, the director’s eyes grew large and he replied, “That’s not the first time that someone has reported these things.”

I gasped and stepped back.  Unbelievable.  And what about the apparition of the woman walking across the highway near the airport?  For years, I had heard that Indian artifacts had been unearthed during a construction project there until the director informed me that something much more sacred had been found in the area.  I listened intently, holding my breath with anticipation as I heard him say, “The body of an Indian woman was unearthed in the location you are speaking about.”

A chill crawled from the bottom of my heels to the top of my head like fingernails raking across my body as I began to realize exactly where I was living.  And why did my kids keep finding mounds of mussel shells near our yard?  According to the friends of Indiana Jones, the natives had many feasts here, and my house was situated close to the “trash mound”.  Could my house be situated over a native’s final resting place?  Could that be the reason that I continue to experience paranormal phenomena here?  Maybe so, but I will probably NEVER have the courage to disturb an ancient grave and risk suffering the consequences of its supernatural curse.  Although I admire archaeologists and their work, I will admit that living with a ghost is one thing.  Getting rid of an ancient curse? Better call your local shaman.

Suggested reading~ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curse_of_the_pharaohs

Additional pictures from the annual meeting of

The Mississippi Association of Archaeology.

indian-burial-ground

indian-shaman